Xavier Kataquapit

To Wish Upon A Star

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:36

I had forgotten what it was like to be in the deep wilderness with no outside contact whatever. Recently I have been spending some time in the far north at a cabin by a lake. It is strange to find myself disconnected from everything and everyone. I have no phone service, no cell phone reception and of course no internet connectivity. I don't even have radio reception.

The Woods Are Alive With The Sound Of ?

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:36

I woke up one morning in a half dazed fog. I was in the woods at a cottage in the wilderness where normally the forest was quiet and still. There was no wind this night to rustle the leaves in a nearby stand of poplar trees or to blow through the tall pines surrounding the building. It was the early morning, in those dark hours just before the first signs of twilight. My friend Mike had woken me up and I popped up in bed with a focus on the window. He was wondering about a sound. Then it broke the silence. It was a hard knocking sound deep in the woods.

First Nation people benefit from northern mining boom

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:36

There is a mining boom in northern Ontario and Native people are reaping some of the benefits of this development.
Eight area First Nation people celebrated their graduation from mining training at a ceremony held at the Timmins Inns and Suites June 23.
These graduates completed four months of training by Dumas Mining in a partnership program with Wabun Tribal Council, the Matachewan Aboriginal Access to mining jobs Training Strategy (MAATS) and Goldcorp Inc.
All of the graduates have been guaranteed positions with either Dumas Mining or Goldcorp Inc.

Parlez-vois Ininimoowin?

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:36

Recently, I have been spending a lot of time in northern Quebec. The change in scenery is very enjoyable. I have met many great people and I have made a few new friends.
There is something wonderful about crossing the Quebec border from northern Ontario. I always feel more like I am driving into France from some non-French speaking European country. I have done that a couple of times. Although the border is only a few hours away from just about anywhere in northeastern Ontario it seems as though I have travelled to another country when I reach Quebec.

Parlez-vous Ininimoowin?

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:36

Recently, I have been spending a lot of time in northern Quebec. I have met many great people and I have made a few new friends. The change in scenery is very enjoyable.
There is something wonderful about crossing the Quebec border from northern Ontario. I always feel more like I am driving into France from some non-French speaking European country.
I have done that a couple of times. Although the border is only a few hours away from just about anywhere in northeastern Ontario it seems as though I have traveled to another country when I reach Quebec.

Gathering engages Wabun youth

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:36

The fifth annual Wabun Youth Gathering July 18-29 had 85 youth from Wabun Tribal Council communities attend.
The gathering, held in Elk Lake, southeast of Timmins and near Matachewan First Nation, was sponsored by Wabun Tribal Council Health Services. It featured presentations by Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) Grand Chief Stan Beardy and Deputy Grand Chief Terry Waboose.

Many displaced by forest fires in region

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:36

I love this hot and dry summer we are having but it comes with a price. The problem is that many forest fires have been burning throughout Ontario and in particular northern Ontario.
This is a great time of the year for all of us to enjoy the outdoors but we must be aware that when the fire hazard is high we should not be having any campfires.
It is necessary to remember that during these very hot and dry months the forest is like a giant tinderbox. The smallest ignition can result in a terrible fire that causes damage over thousands of hectares of wilderness forest.

Preparation key to moving forward

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:35

Have you ever been stumped? The meaning traditionally has to do with being stuck and unable to proceed with something. It dates back to early agriculture when a farmer hit a stump while ploughing his field and stopped dead.
I really understand the origins of this word after having fought with an 80-year-old stump in my backyard recently. Earlier in the summer I had taken the tall pine down with my chainsaw as it was rotting and had become a danger.
This regal old tree stood more than 50 feet high but something had gotten to it and large holes appeared where rot had set in.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Xavier Kataquapit