Stephanie Wesley - Wawatay News

‘We have to shake the legacy of colonialism’

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:27

Bridget Perrier is a self-described “warrior.” She is a survivor in every sense of the word.
Adopted out by her Ojibwe mother to a non-Native family in Thunder Bay, she suffered sexual abuse at the hands of a family friend. The repercussions of this abuse surfaced when she was placed into a Children’s Aid Society-run group home in the city and was quickly lured into the world of prostitution at the age of 12.
“There were a lot of us,” Perrier said of the underage prostitutes who were working in Thunder Bay.

Science camp helps Sandy Lake fight diabetes

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:27

Sandy Lake First Nation played host to the Let’s Talk Science Camp on Aug. 20 – 24.
The science camp, previously known as Sandy Lake Diabetes Camp, has been happening every year for nearly a decade.
Gary Manoakeesic works for the Sandy Lake Diabetes Prevention program. He said that the mission of the program is to empower Sandy Lake and modify its lifestyle. The goal is to prevent type 2 diabetes in the community through education and physical activities.

Legalized brothels could worsen Thunder Bay’s prostitution problem

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:26

In March of this year, legalized brothels, or “bawdy houses” were given the go-ahead by the Ontario Court of Appeal and could become a reality within the next few months. Hiring security and drivers for women who work in the sex-trade was also legalized. Exploitation by “pimps” is still illegal, as is soliciting sex on the streets.
“The reason solicitation is still illegal is because it’s a public nuisance,” Lana Ray, who works at Ontario Native Women’s Association (ONWA), said.

Youth hold key to the future

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:26

In the First Nations and Inuit Health section of the Health Canada website, it states that “suicide rates are five to seven times higher for First Nations youth than for non-Aboriginal youth.”
On World Suicide Prevention Day in September, Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo said “we must come together to stop the tragic loss of life due to despair and loss of hope, and focus on supporting and empowering the potential among our peoples.”
“Our young people must be supported to fulfill their dreams,” Atleo said.

Big Moments

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:26

2013 has just begun and I can’t wait to see what it brings. A lot happened for me personally in the year of 2012, there were plenty of lows but also a lot of highs.
In fact, Facebook even has a new “trend” where each user can view their “20 biggest moments of the year.”
I viewed mine and was happy with most of what I saw – except for the 19th moment which was “Stephanie Wesley became friends with Classic Roots on Nov. 5, 2012.” Classic Roots is a First Nations electronic dance music disc jockey from Thunder Bay.

Hacker group threatens Thunder Bay police over assault of First Nations woman

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:26

In regards to the on-going investigation of a brutal sexual assault against a First Nations woman in Thunder Bay in December, Thunder Bay Police Service has become the latest target of the hacker activist group Anonymous.
In a Youtube video posted on Jan. 22, Anonymous threatened to release “mountains of dirt” on the Thunder Bay Police Services if the assault case on a local First Nations woman is not taken more seriously.
Anonymous accuses the Thunder Bay Police Service of not taking the assault as seriously as they are claiming to.

Anonymous continues pushing police on assaults on First Nations women

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:25

On Jan. 28, Anonymous launched phase 1 of Operation Thunderbird – #OpThunderbird on Twitter – which many people thought would unleash an onslaught of embarrassing information on the members of the Thunder Bay Police Services (TBPS).
However, instead of divulging any information on TBPS, Anonymous posted a lengthy essay in which they explained that they “don’t need to d0x and hack – yet – condemning evidence is available a plenty in the public domain.”

Pikangikum jingle dancer joins Idle No More rally

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:25

On Jan. 28, Idle No More (INM) supporters convened at Parliament Hill in Ottawa for what was called the INM National Day of Action. Cheryl Suggashie of Pikangikum First Nation, and her friends from her university’s jingle dress program made the journey down to Ottawa for the protest.
“It sounds weird, but I was dreaming about it,” Suggashie said. She described seeing a sea of jingle dress dancers in three of her dreams throughout December.

Missing and murdered women ‘huge issue’

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:25

At noon on Feb.14, 35 people gathered at City Hall in Thunder Bay to participate in the fifth annual Valentine’s Day memorial march for missing and murdered Indigenous women.
Before the march, three women talked to the small crowd about their reasons for organizing and attending the march.
Annette Schroeter or Muskrat Dam First Nation, explained that the subject of missing and murdered Indigenous women is a “huge issue.”
Schroeter was born and raised in Prince George, BC. The city is located on Highway 16 which is known as the “highway of tears.”

Garden River member sent hate mail over Idle No More action

Create: 12/01/2015 - 19:25

Lesley Belleau of Garden River First Nation has received hate mail after taking part in Idle No More-related activities and giving interviews about the movement to the local Sault St. Marie media.
“The letter was delivered to another woman, a, L. Belleau who just so happens to live on the same street I did in Garden River,” Belleau explained. Belleau is currently in Peterborough working on her PhD. “The letter was then delivered by L. Belleau to my sister Belinda, who lives in Garden River.”

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