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March 20, 2014 Volume 41 Number 6

Photos from the edition. Click the ‘View full story’ link to view the complete story.
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Submitted by Ron Kyle

The fire truck in Mishkeegogamang was housed in this unheated building, meaning local firefighers could not store water in the water tank during winter months. The truck was one of 21 purchased by the federal government for First Nations communities in 2009/2010. They were purchased from a Florida-based firm and were not equipped for the cold northern climates.
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Photo courtesy of Congress of Aboriginal Peoples

Members of Apathy Is Boring.
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Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Creating and trying out parachute toys was part of the train-the-trainer activities during the Nishnawbe Kids Business Program, held Feb. 24-25 at the Landmark Inn in Thunder Bay.
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The geological history of Ontario is complex. This image shows the simplified rock geology of Ontario. The pink colour represents granite formed by melting of material within the Earth. The green-coloured rocks formed from ancient volcanoes and are called greenstone belts. The pink and green rocks formed 2.5 to three billion years ago and together form the old Precambrian Shield rocks. Most of the metals that have been mined in Ontario come from the greenstone belts. The yellow coloured area represents sedimentary rocks that formed by erosion of the Precambrian Shield rocks. Geologists estimate that the yellow-coloured area formed 2.4 to 1.1 billion years ago. The brown colour represents different rock types that formed by melting of the Earth, by volcanoes, by erosion, and that were all shuffled on top of each other about one billion years ago when two great land masses ran into each other. The blue-grey coloured rocks are made of limestone, dolomite, and shale, which formed 500 to 100 million years ago. Many of these young rocks formed in a warm ocean, close to the equator.
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Photos submitted by Kaaren Dannenmann

North Spirit Lake band member Kelly Rae sets up a beaver trap.
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Pikangikum First Nation students display the marten boxes they made during the trapping course.

Photos submitted by Kaaren Dannenmann
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This article is part of the #ItEndsHere project , a collaborative response to the calls for a national inquiry by some family members of missing and murdered Aboriginal women. The project can be found at nationsrising.org
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Jana-Rae Yerxa
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Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Geraldton’s Lennox Michon was one of about 60 youth who won awards at the 4th Annual Writing Contest in Thunder Bay.
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Photos by Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Youth having fun was a common theme at this year’s Lakehead University Native Student Association’s Annual Powwow.
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Photos by Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Youth having fun was a common theme at this year’s Lakehead University Native Student Association’s Annual Powwow.
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Photos by Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Youth having fun was a common theme at this year’s Lakehead University Native Student Association’s Annual Powwow.
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Bryan Phalen/Wawatay News

Familiar faces: Two Cat Lake teams, Cat Lake Weecobeyang and Cat Lake Rez 216, battled for the Northern Bands C-side title but remained on friendly terms after the game.
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Bryan Phalen/Wawatay News

Mario Yellowhead, left, celebrates scoring a goal with help from his Nibinamik teammates.
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Wawatay file photo

Richard Soloman and teammate Sheldon Sackaney of the Hudson Bay Cree tied for the tournament lead in points during the Northern First Nations Hockey Tournament in Sioux Lookout.
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Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Moose Cree’s William Small is looking to introduce an expanded polystyrene foundation system to communities across northern Ontario.
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Photos by Bryan Phelan/Wawatay News

The Bushtown Jets from Eabametoong, winners of the 2014 Northern Bands Hockey Tournament.
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Photos by Bryan Phelan/Wawatay News

Sid Atlookan, left, celebrates Bushtown’s championship with his teammate and dad, Leo. A 40-year-old defenceman, Leo has now won eight Northern Bands and Northern First Nations tournament championships with Eabametoong teams. “My brother, Walter Atlookan, was tied with me with seven but he couldn’t make it this year,” Leo says. “So I’m leading now.”
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Photos by Bryan Phelan/Wawatay News

Joe Boyce of the Bushtown Jets makes a pass while pursued by Jonathon Strang of the Pikangikum Ice Bears.
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Photos by Bryan Phelan/Wawatay News

Ezra Yellowhead led the Wolves’ attack in the B-side final with eight goals and an assist.
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Photos by Bryan Phelan/Wawatay News

Ice Bear Mason Pascal squeezes Christian Nate Jr. of the Jets out of the play.
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Photos by Bryan Phelan/Wawatay News

Temus Ombash, right, of Cat Lake Weecobeyang, ties up Gerrick Oombash of Cat Lake Rez 216 in front of the Weecobeyang net.
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Photos by Bryan Phelan/Wawatay News

Nibinamik Wolves won the Northern Bands B-side championship and $8,000 with a win over the Pikangikum Rez 208 Braves.
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Photos by Bryan Phelan/Wawatay News

Jets forward Justin Wabano, no. 18, whoops it up after scoring his second goal of the A-side final.
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Bryan Phelan/Wawatay News

Bushtown’s Chris Bois scores the last goal of the Northern Bands tournament on a breakaway, sealing his team’s 7-1 A-side championship win over goalie Livio Dunsford and his Pikangikum Ice Bear teammates. Dunsford was named the most valuable player after the game. In the B-side, the Nibinamik Wolves defeated the Pikangikum Rez 208 Braves 11-6 to secure the championship. Meanwhile, two Cat Lake teams met in the C-side final, with the Cat Lake Weecobeyang defeating the Cat Lake Rez 216 9-1. The Northern Bands event in Dryden featured 29 teams playing in almost 100 games from March 11 to 16.
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Wawatay file photo

A participant during the 2008 Native American Indigenous Games.
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Submitted photo

Workers in Deer Lake First Nation unwrap the package containing solar panels outside the community’s elementary school. The First Nation’s 1,100 on-reserve citizens currently rely on a run-of-river hydro project and a diesel power plant. Deer Lake Chief Royle Meekis said the solar project will allow the community to hook up housing units to the power grid.
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Submitted by Ron Kyle

The ruins of a house fire in Mishkeegogamang from 2009. The community is still in crisis following a house fire last month that led to the deaths of four people.
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Wawatay file photo

Community members walk in support of missing and murdered Aboriginal women on Valentine’s Day last month.
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Jamie Bananish/Special to Wawatay News

Elder Wanda Baxter performs opening prayer for the Walking With Our Sisters Community Conversation.
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Bryan Phelan/Wawatay News

Gavin Morriseau promotes doughnut sales to Northern Bands Hockey Tournament fans at the Dryden Memorial Arena on Saturday.
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ᐱᓯᒧ ᐃᐡᑯᑌ ᑭᐊᑯᑲᒋᑲᑌᐊᐧᐣ ᒋᐊᐧᑌᓂᑲᑌᐠ ᐊᑎᑯᓴᑲᐃᑲᓂᐠ ᐃᐡᑯᓄᑲᒥᑯᐠ

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