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March 15, 2012 Volume 39 Number 6

Photos from the edition. Click the ‘View full story’ link to view the complete story.
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KI Elder Mary Jane Crowe speaks to a Toronto crowd outside the Prospectors and Developers Association mining conference. KI was protesting on its ongong dispute with God’s Lake Resources, a gold mining company that has started exploration work on KI traditional lands without the First Nation’s approval. The protests were one alternative voice to the massive conference happening across the street, where First Nations from northern Ontario were getting a lot of attention on other mining-related issues.

Shawn Bell
Wawatay News
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Fort Severn blockaded its portion of the winter road to stop trucks carrying asbestos from passing.

Submitted photo.
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submitted photo
Pikangikum students remain out of school after mould was found in the teacherages.
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The site of Attawapiskat’s future school.

Lenny Carpenter — Wawatay News
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Wawatay News archives
Lac Seaul, date unknown.
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Photo by Shawn Bell/Wawatay News
From left to right: David Paul Achneepineskum, CEO of Matawa First Nations, Chris Moonias, band manager of Neskatanga First Nation, and Peter Moonias, Chief of Neskatanga First Nation at the Prspectors and Developers Conference in Toronto.
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The yellow portion shows the area that has been withdrawn from development.

Map submitted by Ministry of Northern Development and Mines
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Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug First Nation councillors, community leaders and Elders held a speaking engagement and rally in Toronto during the Prospectors and Developers Association Conference. The community was protesting about its ongoing dispute with God’s Lake Resources, a gold mining company that was discovered on KI traditional lands last autumn. The company has said it will restart exploration work in the near future, prompting KI Chief Donny Morris to set up a vigil at the Sherman Lake exploration site. KI is calling on the Ontario government to ban the company from its exploration while land use planning is ongoing. Ontario responded by setting 23,000 square kilometers off limits for development, but leaving God’s Lake free to continue its work.
Above, Elder Mary Jane Crowe speaks to the crowd in her Oji-Cree language. The building across the street is the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, where the Prospectors and Developers mining conference was being held. Above right, the group from KI including Lands and Environment’s Stephen Chapman, front, and councillors Cecilia Begg and Randy Nanokeesic during the rally. And above right, the KI contingent held a speaker’s event at the Steelworker’s Hall in Toronto the evening before the rally.
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Stephen Chapman speaking to the crowd at the rally.
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Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug First Nation councillors, community leaders and Elders held a speaking engagement and rally in Toronto during the Prospectors and Developers Association Conference. The community was protesting about its ongoing dispute with God’s Lake Resources, a gold mining company that was discovered on KI traditional lands last autumn. The company has said it will restart exploration work in the near future, prompting KI Chief Donny Morris to set up a vigil at the Sherman Lake exploration site. KI is calling on the Ontario government to ban the company from its exploration while land use planning is ongoing. Ontario responded by setting 23,000 square kilometers off limits for development, but leaving God’s Lake free to continue its work.
Above, Elder Mary Jane Crowe speaks to the crowd in her Oji-Cree language. The building across the street is the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, where the Prospectors and Developers mining conference was being held. Above right, the group from KI including Lands and Environment’s Stephen Chapman, front, and councillors Cecilia Begg and Randy Nanokeesic during the rally. And above right, the KI contingent held a speaker’s event at the Steelworker’s Hall in Toronto the evening before the rally.
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Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug First Nation councillors, community leaders and Elders held a speaking engagement and rally in Toronto during the Prospectors and Developers Association Conference. The community was protesting about its ongoing dispute with God’s Lake Resources, a gold mining company that was discovered on KI traditional lands last autumn. The company has said it will restart exploration work in the near future, prompting KI Chief Donny Morris to set up a vigil at the Sherman Lake exploration site. KI is calling on the Ontario government to ban the company from its exploration while land use planning is ongoing. Ontario responded by setting 23,000 square kilometers off limits for development, but leaving God’s Lake free to continue its work.
Above, Elder Mary Jane Crowe speaks to the crowd in her Oji-Cree language. The building across the street is the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, where the Prospectors and Developers mining conference was being held. Above right, the group from KI including Lands and Environment’s Stephen Chapman, front, and councillors Cecilia Begg and Randy Nanokeesic during the rally. And above right, the KI contingent held a speaker’s event at the Steelworker’s Hall in Toronto the evening before the rally.
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photo by Lenny Carpenter/Wawatay News
Sarah Furlotte of Thunder Bay takes a break on a lake near North Caribou Lake First Nation after hours of driving. The 30-year-old was among five college students who took the winter road to Sachigo Lake First Nation on Feb. 24.
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photo by Lenny Carpenter/Wawatay News
A gas truck approaches on the winter road to Sachigo Lake First Nation. The trucks and other rigs are a common sight on the winter roads to First Nations communities as they stock up on fuel and supplies before the road closes for the season.
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submitted photo
Author Richard Wagamese of Wabaseemoong First Nation received the National Aboriginal Achievement Award in Media and Communications at an awards ceremony on Feb. 24. Wagamese began his writing career in 1979 as a newspaper columnist and reporter and has written 12 books in the last 18 years.
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photo by Rick Garrick/Wawatay News
Chancillor Crane, Mason Strang, Chrisshaun Kakegumick, Daniel Turtle, Jessica McLaughlin, Craig Waboose, Ken Strang and Steven Strang learned more about careers they were interested in during this year’s Project Beyshick in Thunder Bay.
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photo by Rick Garrick/Wawatay News
Lac Seul artist Noreen Wilkins organized the media campaign for the 2012 Annual Lakehead University Major Studio and Juried Student Exhibition, being held March 9-April 1 at the Thunder Bay Art Gallery.
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photo courtesy of the Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa
Wolverines, the largest land-dwelling members of the family Mustelidae (weasels), are found primarily in remote reaches of the northern boreal forests and the subarctic and alpine tundra.
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Photo by Lenny Carpenter/Wawatay News
Dancers, in regalia or plain clothes, took part in a powwow at the Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School on Family Day.
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photo by Lenny Carpenter/Wawatay News
James Wilkinson performs a duet with Jamie Labrador, a member of Eagle Lake First Nation, on March 10 at a fundraiser that aims bring a vocal coach and talent agent to Thunder Bay.
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The Chisasibi Hunters took home the Mushkegowuk Challege Cup novice championship. The team consisted of (in no particular order): Jayden Bobbish, Tristan Petawabano, Dainius Pelchat, Dominic Lameboy, Skylar Georgekish, Jarris Chiskamish, Jayden Sealhunter, Josie-James Sam, Christina Sam, Wayne Sealhunter, Linneirria Matthew, Keyshawn Chakapash, Kaylin Kanatewat, Alex Chewanish, Riley Duff, Justin Mianscum, Mayson Sam and Storm Blackned.
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Mushkegowuk Challenge Cup Sr. Girls Champions Kashechewan Icedogs poses with members of the finalist team, Attawapiskat Northwind. The 5th Annual Mushkegowuk Challenge Cup took place in Timmins during the Feb. 25-27 weekend, where close to 40 teams played in eight age-divisions. The tournament featured teams from Peawanuck, Attawapiskat, Kashechewan, Fort Albany, Moosonee, Moose Factory, Taykwa Tagamou, Chisasibi, Waskaganish and Wemindji. Tournament co-organizer Linda Carey called the tournament a success.
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Residnetial School survivor Mike Metatawabin poses with a group of Fort Albany students who were in Thunder Bay visiting Lakehead University during the school’s Aboriginal Awareness week.

Photos by Shawn Bell/Wawatay News
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submitted photo
Lilyanna McKay, 17, Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug First Nation.
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photo by Lenny Carpenter/Wawatay News
Catherine Cheechoo, 30, Moose Cree First Nation
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St. John Emile Kakekagumick, from Sandy Lake, is the author of this poem and the artist behind the cover of this Healing the Legacy section, shown below.
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St. John Emile Kakekagumick, from Sandy Lake, is the author of this poem and the artist behind the cover of this Healing the Legacy section.
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photo by Lenny Carpenter/Wawatay News
Henry Beardy, 25, Sachigo Lake First Nation
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photo by Lenny Carpenter/Wawatay News
Jordan Shapwaykeesic, 22, Whitesand First Nation
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Anishnawbe Mushkiki’s Teresa Trudeau and Corrina Gagnon described how their new sweat lodge has been helping clients just before an International Women’s Day event was held at the Thunder Bay-based Aboriginal community health centre.

Rick Garrick — Wawatay News
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Kanina and Brent Wesley celebrated a traditional wedding in 2009. Brent said they wanted to honour their culture by doing the wedding this way. Following the ceremony he wrote “to live our culture is to practice it daily, to do the ceremonies, to carry out the rituals. The wedding ceremony is one ritual. Others can be naming ceremonies, birthing ceremonies, the first kill ceremony, the berry fast. It’s a long list. But these are all things the Cree and Ojibwe people have done for thousands of years. And to ensure our culture survives we must practice it. We must live it. “

This photo, by Dale+Joy Photography, first ran in the October 2009 edition of Seven

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